Bookmarked! 9th December

As usual, stuff to check out:

  • Ryan contatcted me while I was on hiatus last month to inform me that his publisher Gryphonwood Press is now accepting web fiction subs. Worth a look, and he’s recently announced that they’re taking in submissions for a new anthology. 
  • This is probably one of the saddest articles I’ve seen in awhile: Aida Edemariam on sifting through the publishing industry’s slush pile. She writes that the Internet is causing a decrease in the number of unsolicited manuscripts to publishers, though people still submit them, praying that one’ll eventually be picked up and put to press.

    The internet, of course, means that more and more people publish straight on to the web, either as is, or to get peers to comment on it. Ten years ago Hamish Hamilton was getting 20 manuscripts a week rather than four, and Prosser puts this decrease down not just to active discouragement, but also the ways in which writers are learning to circumvent the traditional machine. “I do think there’s been an opening up,” says Swift. “A lot of writers are taking things into their own hands and publishing online.I think sending things in blind now is about the most stupid thing you can do.”

    Watch out for the article’s ending – it made me sigh.

  • I’d also like to direct you to Amber Simmon’s web fiction project A Timely Raven. I gave it a 4.5 on Web Fiction Guide, and I really recommend you read it. This is non-linear fiction at its best, and Simmons has also leveraged design to present a truly compelling story.

Possibly Related Posts:

Category: Bookmarked! · Publishing
  • http://www.lethebashar.wordpress.com lethe

    I checked out a Timely Raven and I’m putting it on my blogroll. Very impressive use of the medium.

  • http://www.novelr.com Eli James

    I agree, Lethe. What Amber has done is remarkable.

  • http://undeadflowers.com Richard Peevers

    I want to thank you too for a link to Timely Raven–it’s really extremely well written.

  • http://www.novelr.com Eli James

    You’re welcomed, Richard. Merry Christmas!